Oral Systemic

Articles

  • Strength Of Evidence Relating Periodontal Disease And Cardiovascular Disease

    The objective of this review is to assess the strength of evidence relating periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease.
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  • Smart Tips #4: Repiratory Disease And Oral Health

    Residents of long-term care facilities are often at a greater risk of developing respiratory diseases, such as pneumonia. Poor oral hygiene may be one reason for this development because the bacteria that cause respiratory disease may be present in dental plaque. Previous studies have demonstrated a reduced incidence of respiratory disease development in patients who received daily oral hygiene care while in long-term care facilities. A recent study examined the levels of respiratory pathogens present in the dental plaque of patients in a long-term care facility. The investigators found that dental plaque can be a source of respiratory pathogens, and suggest that oral hygiene protocols be instituted to help reduce the development of respiratory disease in this population of patients.
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  • Smart Tips #2: Cardiovascular Disease And Oral Inflammation

    Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and/or blood vessels. More than 50 million Americans experience cardiovascular problems and cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death and disability in the United States. By the time heart problems are detected, the underlying cause (atherosclerosis) is usually quite advanced. Therefore, prevention through the modification of risk factors, such as healthy eating, exercise, and not smoking, is key.
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  • Smart Tips #1: Diabetes And Oral Inflammation

    Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. Of the 20.8 million children and adults in the United States who have diabetes, nearly one-third are unaware that they have the disease.
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  • Periodontal Infection And Glycemic Control In Diabetes: Current Evidence

    Both diabetes and periodontal diseases are common chronic diseases. This article describes the current evidence regarding the relationship between periodontal infections and glycemic control in diabetes.
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  • Oral Health-General Health Interrelationships: Health Policy Implications

    The World Health Organization (WHO) is an association of ministries of health. Scientific knowledge is used to build public health programs that are evidence-based.
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  • Inflammation: The Relationship Between Oral Health And Systemic Disease

    Since the mid 1990s, both the scientific community and the public have been inundated with articles addressing the association between systemic diseases and oral health.
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  • Systemic Health Forum: A Journey Of Discovery

    Is oral infection and inflammation a risk for systemic conditions? It has taken more than 300 years to arrive at the point we are today. The articles in this special issue, which are based on presentations at the International Consensus Forum on Oral and Systemic Health in Montreal, review the current evidence on the contribution of oral bacteria to systemic health. As a first step, it is helpful to review the past to see how the question of the oral/systemic connection evolved over three centuries. This article presents a brief overview of that journey.
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  • Diagnostic And Therapeutic Strategies For The Management Of The Diabetic Patient

    The bridge between oral and systemic health exists and becomes more concrete as data continue to emerge in support of this relationship.
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  • Diabète sucré : Stratégies pour fournir des soins de santé complets

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder that has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. The disease affects 18.2 million Americans, yet approximately one-third of these individuals remains undiagnosed. An additional 41 million individuals have prediabetes. It is estimated that one in three that were born in the year 2000 will have diabetes, and that diabetes will increase by 225% between 2000 and 2050.
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  • Compendium: Exploring The Relationship Between Oral Health And Systemic Health Within The African American Population

    Much published research documents continuing racial and ethnic disparities in health, particularly for African Americans, which apply to both oral and systemic diseases. Current research suggests biologically plausible associations between oral and systemic diseases; however, clear causeand- effect relationships have not been substantiated. Some researchers and health care providers have noted anecdotal associations between oral and systemic health, as well as compounding adverse effects of oral and systemic diseases and dysfunctions.
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  • Better Oral Health May Mean Better Overall Health

    Improper oral health leads to plaque buildup and plaque formation may lead to gingivitis, which in some patients may progress to periodontitis, a more severe form of gum disease.
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  • Gingivitis: New Insights Into Inflammation And Periodontal Diseases

    At the forefront of dentistry today is an increasing knowledge of the role of chronic inflammation and the changes it can cause in both the oral cavity and systemically. Now you can gain a new level of understanding with these informative articles to help you more effectively treat your patients with gingival inflammation.
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  • Host Modulation For The Treatment Of Periodontal Diseases

    Until the 1970s, treatment strategies for periodontal disease were primarily based on the understanding that plaque bacteria and their products mediated the tissue destruction in periodontal patients.
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  • Infection Or Inflammation: The Link Between Periodontal Disease And Systemic Disease

    There is increasing evidence that chronic infections are associated with cardiovascular diseases. A number of hypotheses have been put forward to explain these associations, including common susceptibility, systemic inflammation, direct infection of the blood vessels, and cross-reactivity or molecular mimicry between bacterial and self-antigens.
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  • Periodontal Disease and Overall Health: A Clinician's Guide

    Periodontal disease is one of the most common diseases of man and is responsible for most of the tooth loss in adults. Periodontal disease has received considerable attention in the past several decades and a new understanding of the disease is emerging.
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